Sinus Drainage Information.

What is sinus drainage?

drainageSinus drainage is the draining of mucus or pus from the nasal sinuses. The sinuses are air-filled cavities in the bones that surround the nose and eyes. They have a lining that continually produces mucus, which drains into openings in the middle and at the back of the nose through narrow channels.

drainageThe two frontal sinuses are just above the eyebrows, the two maxillary sinuses by the cheekbones and the two ethmoidal sinuses are between the nasal cavity and the eye sockets, and drain into the middle of the nose. It is usually the maxillary sinuses that require sinus drainage.

 

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So, what are the reasons for having sinus drainage?

drainageWhen you have a cold, the lining of the nose becomes inflamed and swells, which blocks off the channels through which the sinuses drain. When these are blocked, a bacterial growth can occur within the sinuses and causes acute sinusitis (inflammation of the sinuses), which usually affects the maxillary sinuses. Sometimes, however, the source of pain is a tooth abscess or bleeding into the sinuses after a facial injury.

drainageThe simple proven solution is to use a sinus drainage treatment that destroys bacteria without damaging your immune system. this can even be used in conjunction with conventional drugs.

drainageChronic (long-term) sinusitis usually results from nasal allergy. This, too, causes blockage of the drainage channels and results in a bacterial growths that may have to be drained.

drainageSurgical treatment of sinusitis is performed much less commonly nowadays because the pain is always treated first with antibiotics and decongestant drugs. However, if the bacterial activity is persistent and does not respond to antibiotics, doctors say that surgery is necessary to let the pus drain out. This is important to prevent the bacterial activity spreading to the brain, which is very close to the sinuses.

drainageHowever, you could try the simple proven solution, a sinus drainage treatment that destroys bacteria without damaging your immune system. this can even be used in conjunction with conventional drugs.


What happens during sinus drainage?

Two types of operation are performed to treat sinusitis. Both are procedures performed by an ENT (ear, nose and throat) surgeon and both can be performed under local or general anaesthetic.

'Antral puncture and washout' is the older of the two operations and is carried out less commonly. The surgeon uses an instrument called a 'trochar and canula' to make a small hole inside the nose and into the maxillary sinus. Some of the pus is sucked out and sent to the laboratory to identify the bacteria that is causing the problem. ( The simple proven solution is to use a sinus congestion treatment that destroys bacteria without damaging your immune system. This can even be used in conjunction with conventional drugs.) After that, a syringe is used to wash the remaining pus out of the sinus.

'Intranasal antrostomy' is the other operation and these days is carried out more often than antral puncture and washout. The surgeon cuts a small hole, about a centimetre long, inside the nose into the maxillary sinus, at about the same place as the hole made in an antral puncture. The pus is sucked out.

The main difference between these two operations is that the hole cut in an intranasal antrostomy is permanent, whereas the hole made in antral puncture closes up almost immediately. If the hole closes up, the sinus can potentially become infected and fill up with pus again. (Remember, unless the bacteria is sorted- an operation is pointless!) The simple proven solution is to use a sinus treatment that destroys bacteria without damaging your immune system. This can even be used in conjunction with conventional drugs.

Also, intranasal antrostomy is often performed using an instrument called a 'fibreoptic nasendoscope', a small, flexible, fibreoptic tube that transmits images and that can be inserted into the nose and sinus by the surgeon. In this way, the surgeon can see inside the sinus and a more thorough clean-out can be achieved.


What happens before sinus drainage?

No special preparations are needed for this operation, apart from avoiding food and drink for about six to eight hours before the procedure if you are to have a general anaesthetic. You may be given a decongestant spray or paste to reduce any inflammation in the nose.

What should I expect in hospital?

When you arrive at the hospital or day surgery unit, a nurse or a doctor will ask you questions about your general health to make sure you are fit enough for the procedure, check that you have not had anything to eat or drink and check your pulse and blood pressure. You must tell the doctor or nurse if you have had any allergic or unusual reactions to drugs in the past. You (or your parents if you are younger than 16 years old) will be asked to sign a consent form to say that you understand the procedure and have given your permission for it to be done. You need to put on a hospital gown and remove any loose orthodontic braces, false teeth and jewellery.

What are the possible common complications?

The truth is, anything can happen. However, the official line is....

No serious complications arise with sinus drainage, other than those associated with a general anaesthetic. Chest problems and thrombosis are possible complications after any general anaesthetic, but are more likely if you smoke or are very overweight. You may have some minor pain and headache, which can be treated using simple painkillers.

How long will I have to stay in hospital?

Both operations are performed as day cases. In fact, antral puncture and washout takes little more than half an hour and is no worse than a visit to the dentist.

What happens after the sinus drainage?

Make sure you have someone to take you home, especially if you have had a general anaesthetic. You will almost certainly be given antibiotics to take after the operation. (Again, don't forget, antibiotics damage your system. You might want to try a non sinus drainage treatment first.You should take it easy for a few days and not go swimming for about 10 days after the operation.

There are literally hudreds of natural treatments. A natural health practitioner can assess your ear, nose and throat condition and recommend treatments that match your constitution. Ear, nose and throat treatments may include herbal medicine, anti-inflammatory enzymes, nutritional counseling, acupuncture, acupressure, homeopathy or chiropractic.

However, it will help you to remember this.
Ear, nose and throat problems arecaused by bacteria growing in your head.
Kill the bacteria and you will solve the problem. However, antibiotics help destroy your immune system leaving you wide open to further problems.
The simple proven solution is to use a non sinus drainage treatment that destroys sinus bacteria without damaging your immune system. This can even be used in conjunction with conventional drugs. Sinus Drainage.

 

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